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the-queen-of-coney-island:

⊱☼⊰
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Its mothers day. I spent the night dealing with a sick child and I am exhausted. Of course the child wakes perfectly well and full of energy while I drag myself out of bed. I am tired. I am tired of my life. Tired of being a single parent. Tired watching the sun rise and set. Sick of seasons coming and going. Wish I never existed. I am so broken of a person I feel there are no words to describe. Tired of crying for weeks. What a shitty mother I am. I am not celebrating mothers day today.

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Pizza is the best combination of foods ever put together

Pizza is the best combination of foods ever put together

(via areu-fucking-kiddingme)

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My fingers hurt from playing the guitar. They said I should have started with the acoustic instead of electric. Fuck it. Electric makes me happy so electric it is.

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cinque-spotted:

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge by offered a counter challenge,
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

#THIS IS FREAKIN COOL AS SHIT #can we just note the last paragraph #’victorian era prejudices against women drove the sport underground’ #you’re saying ‘turned fighting into a gentleman’s sport’ but all i’m seeng is VICTORIAN LADY FIGHT CLUB#WHERE ARE THE NOVELS? GIVE ME NOVELS #MAKE THE LADIES KISS#MAKE THE LADIES TELL THEIR HUSBANDS THEY’RE OFF TO SEE THEIR SISTERS FOR TEA #MAKE THE LADIES SWAP TIPS ON HOW TO BANDAGE THEIR KNUCKLES AND CONCEAL BRUISES WITH POWDER #MAKE THE LADIES PASS EACH OTHER FLASKS OF BRANDY WHILE THEY’RE SITTING ON THE SIDELINES TENDING THEIR INJURIES AND WATCHING THE NEXT FIGHT#MAKE THE LADIES WEAR LOOSE BREECHES AND PRACTICAL RIDING BOOTS#MAKE THE LADIES COME FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE; MAKE A PICKPOCKET STRIKE UP A FRIENDSHIP SLASH RIVALRY WITH THE DAUGHTER OF A COUNTESS #MAKE THE LADIES KISS!!!!!!!!!!!!! #i’m fine. i’m fine. #history (via marthur)

cinque-spotted:

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge by offered a counter challenge,

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”

Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

          (via marthur)

(Source: peashooter85, via gingerputin)

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(Source: afreakeili, via the-wolfs-girl)

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scienceyoucanlove:

Fertile women release one or more eggs every month, but until now, only fuzzy images had been recorded.The new images were taken by accident by gynaecologist Jacques Donnez while carrying out a partial hysterectomy on a 45-year-old woman.The release of an egg was thought to be a sudden event, but the pictures published in New Scientist magazine show it takes over 15 minutes for the translucent yellow sphere to emerge.“The release of the oocyte (immature egg cell) from the ovary is a crucial event in human reproduction. These pictures are clearly important to better understand the mechanism,” Donnez, from the Catholic University of Louvain in Brussels, said.Shortly before the egg is released, enzymes break down the tissue in a fluid-filled sac on the surface of the ovary that contains the egg. A reddish protrusion forms and then a hole appears from which the egg emerges.The egg is surrounded by supporting cells, which protect it as it enters the Fallopian tube on its way to the uterus.Professor Alan McNeilly, from the Medical Research Council’s Human Reproduction Unit in Edinburgh, told the BBC: “It really is a fascinating insight into ovulation, and to see it in real life is an incredibly rare occurrence.It really is a pivotal moment in the whole process, the beginnings of life in a way.”Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/
text source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Fertile women release one or more eggs every month, but until now, only fuzzy images had been recorded.

The new images were taken by accident by gynaecologist Jacques Donnez while carrying out a partial hysterectomy on a 45-year-old woman.

The release of an egg was thought to be a sudden event, but the pictures published in New Scientist magazine show it takes over 15 minutes for the translucent yellow sphere to emerge.

“The release of the oocyte (immature egg cell) from the ovary is a crucial event in human reproduction. These pictures are clearly important to better understand the mechanism,” Donnez, from the Catholic University of Louvain in Brussels, said.

Shortly before the egg is released, enzymes break down the tissue in a fluid-filled sac on the surface of the ovary that contains the egg. A reddish protrusion forms and then a hole appears from which the egg emerges.

The egg is surrounded by supporting cells, which protect it as it enters the Fallopian tube on its way to the uterus.

Professor Alan McNeilly, from the Medical Research Council’s Human Reproduction Unit in Edinburgh, told the BBC: “It really is a fascinating insight into ovulation, and to see it in real life is an incredibly rare occurrence.

It really is a pivotal moment in the whole process, the beginnings of life in a way.”

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

text source 

(via scinerds)

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Sad, but true…stay away from people who think it’s okay to do this to you and never trust them again. -

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Peopel should always be honest -

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bagofsocks:

bestofcardsagainsthumanity:

That about sums it up.

It even rhymes

bagofsocks:

bestofcardsagainsthumanity:

That about sums it up.

It even rhymes

(via netflix-subtitles)

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Quote
"And still,
I wait for you."

— Six Word Circumstance (via siameasy)

(Source: graciouswords, via daddyfuckedme)

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griseus:

ADIPOSE FINS (CONSIDERED VESTIGIAL) MAY HAVE EVOLVED AS ADAPTATION (Convergent evolution) IN SOME FISH

A new study has discovered that adipose fins may have repeatedly evolved as a key adaptation in some fish.
Adipose fins are appendages found on the dorsal midline between the dorsal and caudal fins in more than 6000 living species of teleost fishes. It has been consistently argued that adipose fins evolved once and have been lost repeatedly across teleosts owing to limited function
Adipose fins are small, fleshy and usually not as elaborately structured as other fins. Although some 6,000 species of fish—including trout, catfish, and salmon—have them, relatively few researchers have studied these structures in the last half-century.
Now Scientists demonstrate that adipose fins originated repeatedly by using phylogenetic and anatomical evidence. This suggests that adipose fins are adaptive, although their function remains undetermined

Reference: Stewart 2014. The origins of adipose fins: an analysis of homoplasy and the serial homology of vertebrate appendages
Photo by  Dan Kitchens
More: The Scientist

griseus:

ADIPOSE FINS (CONSIDERED VESTIGIAL) MAY HAVE EVOLVED AS ADAPTATION (Convergent evolution) IN SOME FISH

A new study has discovered that adipose fins may have repeatedly evolved as a key adaptation in some fish.

Adipose fins are appendages found on the dorsal midline between the dorsal and caudal fins in more than 6000 living species of teleost fishes. It has been consistently argued that adipose fins evolved once and have been lost repeatedly across teleosts owing to limited function

Adipose fins are small, fleshy and usually not as elaborately structured as other fins. Although some 6,000 species of fish—including trout, catfish, and salmon—have them, relatively few researchers have studied these structures in the last half-century.

Now Scientists demonstrate that adipose fins originated repeatedly by using phylogenetic and anatomical evidence. This suggests that adipose fins are adaptive, although their function remains undetermined

(via ichthyologist)

Quote
"There are those who will say that insisting on gender-neutral books and toys for children is a bizarre experiment in social engineering by radical lefties and paranoid “femininazis” who won’t allow boys to be boys, and girls to be girls. (Because, by the way, seeking equality of rights and opportunities was a key plank of Nazi ideology, was it?) But the “experiment” is nothing new. When I grew up in the 1970s, and when my parents grew up in the 1950s, brothers and sisters shared the same toys, books and games, which came in many more colours than just pink and blue, and there was no obvious disintegration of society as a result. Publishers and toy companies like to say that they are offering parents more “choice” these days by billing some of their products as just for boys and others as just for girls. What they’re actually doing, by convincing children that boys and girls can’t play with each other’s stuff, is forcing parents to buy twice as much stuff."

Gender-specific books demean all our children. So the Independent on Sunday will no longer review anything marketed to exclude either sex - Comment - Voices - The Independent (via becauseiamawoman)

(via forumgamer)

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greeneyes55:

Pierre et Paulette
 Saint-Germain Des Pres Paris 1962
Photo: Ed van der Elsken 

beautiful kiss

greeneyes55:

Pierre et Paulette

Saint-Germain Des Pres Paris 1962

Photo: Ed van der Elsken 

beautiful kiss

(via thedesired)